HIV

HIV


There are at least four key ways in which migration is tied to the spread of HIV:

  • Migrants are highly mobile and mobility can encourage high risk sexual behaviour.
  • Mobility can make people more difficult to reach for HIV prevention, treatment, care.
  • Lack of coordinated cross-border referral systems has negative effects for people who move across borders, as well as for sedentary populations with whom they interact.
  • Migrants' multi-local social networks create opportunities for sexual networking.
  • There is a higher rate of HIV infection in “communities of the mobile”, which often include socially, economically and politically marginalized people. This is because mobile populations and migrants may work and reside in spaces of vulnerability, where physical, social and economic conditions may lead to increased risk of acquisition of HIV.

In addition, social, economic and political factors in both the country of origin and destination influence HIV risk for migrants, the partners they leave behind and new partners in their destination. Other factors that contribute to HIV risk amongst migrants include the HIV prevalence in the countries of origin, gender disparities and unequal vulnerabilities amongst girls and young women to HIV, or among migrants in key populations such as sex workers, men having sex with men, people who inject drugs. Learn more: Population mobility and HIV

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Resources

Knowledge, attitudes and practices - IOM health education sessions - South Sudan 2011

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Emerging practices in migration & HIV programming in Southern Africa 2011

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Biological and behavioural survey among migrant female sex workers Nairobi Kenya 2010

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Health vulnerabilities of mobile populations and affected communities Namibia 2014

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HIV TB and Human Rights in Southern and East Africa 2016 - ARASA

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IOM briefing note - HIV 2015

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